FREEWRITING EXERCISE #31

Photo by Pravin Bagde on Unsplash

A root snaking into the wrist
to find its way vining through
and around the spine like the
snake on the staff of Hermes
but completely satiated and
quite unlike its nature it does
not feel like hunting today.
There is a certain zone
between the ground and
space where no-one owns.
Sometimes when I think
about you I find myself
there, looking for comets
snaking their ways past
planets and planets.
I read a theory that we
were the only things
alive in this universe.
At first, a bit sad. Morose.
How can our God be so
kind? So small? But then
again, how blessed we are,
to have been born in the
same century under the
same sky. How many die
rolls to achieve this result,
how many permutations
in god’s astral calculator,
how many stars have been
shifted apart to allow for
this intrusion. We are so
small, but that makes us
so powerful, so free.
When I first started
walking down this path
I felt my skin flushed
with heat, warmth.
This confirmed two
things for me: I was
not a snake, and I had
a pulse. Simple enough
but always in need,
I don’t know where
I’m going anymore
but I don’t want to.
I have plenty of
desire but I have
hardly found
someone to give them to.
I wanted to dump
them by the side
of a busy expressway
but I suppose
that is where I’m headed:
down the PIE, past the
columns of relentless
movement, down to
reclaim what was
once mine, what
always was, what
always will be.

Photo by Sadanand Lowanshi on Unsplash

Freewriting Explanation: Every day, Valen shall use 5 minutes to write completely unprompted and uninterrupted, letting the words lead the way. There is no end purpose to each piece, but rather, the pieces are allowed to develop naturally in their own way. The pieces are then uploaded without edits.

Filed under: Freewriting, Poetry

by

A member of Singapore-based writing collective /stop@BadEndRhymes ("/s@ber"), Valen dwells in the swamp of poetry. He has been published in various publications, including Anxious Poets Society, Eunoia Review and Quarterly Literary Review Singapore. He has performed his work at the Arts House, the Singapore Art Museum, and in various dingy bars.

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